Post Tagged with: "ethnic minorities"

Min (Mǐn fāngyán 闽方言)

Margaret Mian YAN The Min dialect group is the most divergent and complicated of China’s seven major languages. At least six Min subdialect groups exist. Min is a geographic short term for “Fujian Province” in China. It is named after the largest river “Min jiang” 闽江 in the province. Chinese dialectologists have used Min for decades as a linguistic term […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Language and Learning, Linguistics

Xiang (Xiāng 湘)

OOI Giok Ling Xiang is the name of the people and local sublanguage of the central southeastern province of Hunan. The Xiang people are one of three subgroups of Han Chinese that settled south of Mandarin-speaking Chinese; their language is complex with many dialects. The name Xiang is derived from the older literary name of Hunan. It is estimated that […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare

Leadership—Ethnic Minority (Shǎoshù mínzú gànbù 少数民族干部)

Cheng LI Chinese leaders recognize the value of ethnic minority integration, but have maintained power by appointing ethnic Han to many important positions. Understanding the changing role of minorities in Chinese politics is essential for comprehending China’s transforming political landscape. The changing role of ethnic minorities in Chinese politics is helping to transform the political landscape. Recent problems in the […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Indigenous Peoples—Taiwan (Táiwān yuánzhùmínzú 台湾原住民族)

Indigenous Peoples—Taiwan (Táiwān yuánzhùmínzú 台湾原住民族)

Michael STAINTON A village chief of the Rukai, one of Taiwan’s smaller indigenous tribes, visiting the Department of Anthropology at Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule of the island, 1896. The indigenous peoples of Taiwan are the island’s original Austronesian inhabitants. They are a diverse collection of ethnic groups who have preserved and transformed their cultures over 400 years […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Uygurs (Wéiwú’ěrzú 维吾尔族)

Uygurs (Wéiwú’ěrzú 维吾尔族)

Juten ODA Uygur couple on donkey cart head to market with produce in baskets. Turfan, Xinjiang. PHOTO BY JOAN LEBOLD COHEN. Uygurs are a Turkic group in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. During most of the past ten centuries they lived under the control of Mongolian peoples. After the Uygur rebellion of 1931–1934 the Chinese government granted the Uygurs the status […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare

Hakka (Kèjiārén 客家人)

OOI Giok Ling The Hakka are an ethnolinguistic minority group. About 40 million live in China, mostly in the south, but it is thought that even larger Hakka populations exist outside China than within the country, in Malaysia, Australia, Canada, and the United States. They are known for their ethnic solidarity; the government considers them a part of the Han […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Miao (Miáozú 苗族)

Miao (Miáozú 苗族)

Chuan-kang SHIH A young girl dressed in traditional Miao (Hmong) clothing and jewelry. The Miao are famous for the craftsmanship of their silver ornaments. PHOTO BY WANG YING. As one of the fifty-five officially recognized ethnic minority groups in China, the Miao have a long and rich history. They have demonstrated the highest level of ethnic adherence and tenacity despite […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Hmong (Miáozú 苗族)

Hmong (Miáozú 苗族)

Nicholas TAPP Hmong (Miao) girls in silver headdresses. COURTESY OF PAUL AND BERNICE NOLL. The Hmong, whose own name for themselves is not officially recognized in China, are a mainly agricultural people living mostly in the southern provinces of Sichuan, Guizhou, and Yunnan, as well as Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; there is also a considerable diaspora population in Southeast Asia […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Manchu (Manzú 满族)

Manchu (Manzú 满族)

Robert John PERRINS Group of Manchu men, Peking [Beijing], China, 13 March 1901. UNDERWOOD & UNDERWOOD COLLECTION, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. The Manchus are the second largest (after the Zhuang) of China’s fifty-five official ethnic minority groups, numbering around 10 million people (2000 estimate). They overthrew the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) to establish China’s last imperial era, the Qing dynasty (1644–1912). The […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare
Moso (Mósuō 摩梭)

Moso (Mósuō 摩梭)

Chuan-kang SHIH A woman of the Moso people, a matrilineal society. The Moso is a minority ethnic group in southwest China, officially classified, against their will, as a subgroup of the Naxi people. Women, not men, are at the center of Moso culture. The Moso practice a unique visiting system of sexual union in which conjugal partners do not marry […]

by · 23 January 2012 · Comments are Disabled · Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, Community, Society and Social Welfare